Study Notes

SKILL TRAINING

Skills form the basis of all sporting movement. An athlete develops the ability through training, to execute a skill at the right time.

They generally do this through knowing, feeling and doing the skill in practise.

Athletes develop their understanding of the skill at a cognitive level.

Through practise, they develop the feeling of the skill and mentally understand the concept of it and then move into applying or doing the skill, which requires practise to execute the skill effectively.

– Drills Practise

Drills in training are intended to replicate movements or skills used in a particular sport.

Athletes will complete drills in training to reinforce skills with a focus on improving technique and performance.

Skills need to be broken down into parts, allowing the athlete to focus on specific elements in isolation before adding more components. It is important that the athlete receives plenty of feedback to help develop the skill during practise.

– Modified and Small Sided Games

This area of training is an important area that can focus on tactical and strategic development in team games.

Small-sided games are generally designed to simulate game play as much as possible.

It allows the athlete to focus on their decision-making and problem solving in a modified environment.

Often, athletes will see these games as a fun extension of training and can increase player involvement, as there is more contact with the ball and fitness levels as they can become quite intense.

– Games for Specific Outcomes

This type of training is developed by the coaching staff to develop tactical awareness, decision making and focus on achieving a specific outcome.

The focus is not on skill development, rather developing tactics by understanding space, time, force, the individual and teammate or opponent.

Coaches utilise this type of training to develop an understanding of the game, positional play or tactics that will benefit the athlete in different scenarios. An example being, a soccer player completing 2v1 practise and working on taking the right option at the right time.

Full Written Notes

Critical Question 1 – How do athletes train for improved performance?

SKILL TRAINING

Skills form the basis of all sporting movement. An athlete develops the ability, through training, to execute a skill at the right time. Athletes develop understanding, feeling and application of a skill through practise.

Individuals develop their understanding of the skill at a cognitive level. Once they develop the feeling of the skill, mentally understanding the concept of it, they can move onto to the application of the skill, which requires repeated practice in order to execute the skill effectively.

Drills Practise

Drills in training are intended to replicate movements or skills used in a particular sport. Athletes will complete drills in training to reinforce skills with a focus on improving technique and performance.

Skills must be broken down into parts, allowing the athlete to focus on specific elements in isolation before adding more components. It is essential that the athletes receive plenty of feedback to help develop their skill during practise and training.

Modified and Small Sided Games          

This area of training focuses on tactical and strategic development in team games. Small-sided games are generally designed to simulate game play as much as possible. This allows the athlete to develop their their decision-making and problem solving abilities in a modified environment.

These games can be planned as a fun extension of training increasing player involvement, as there is more contact with the ball and variety in fitness levels, impacting the intensity of the training.

Games for Specific Outcomes

This type of training is developed by the coaching staff to develop tactical awareness, decision making and direct focus on achieving a specific outcome. The objective of this training is not on skill development. Instead athletes learn understand space, time, force and the individual teammate or opponent.

Coaches utilise this type of training to develop a more holistic understanding of the game, positional plays or general tactics, which will benefit the athlete in different scenarios. A good example would be, 2v1 soccer practise where a player learns to make the best decision at the right time.