Study Notes

FLEXIBILITY TRAINING

– Static

Static stretching involves a slow stretch that holds the muscle at a specific length. The muscle reaches its end point, where the stretch is held, generally for approximately 30 seconds.

This is the most common form of stretching, especially for children and novice athletes.

This is because it is easy to perform and minimal risk is involved as the athlete can feel their own limitations.

You will see athletes utilise this form of stretching in both the warm up and cool down phases of a session. It can also be used by individuals who have an injury and are trying to restore their range of movement and stretch the muscle.

– Dynamic

Dynamic stretching is where the athlete uses a controlled movement to lengthen and shorten the muscles – usually mimicking the movement that will be performed within the sport or activity they are about to undertake.

The stretch should not force the range of motion to exceed what is natural for that movement.

This stretch is relatively safe, though can cause injuries if the athlete has not warmed up properly or tries to exceed their joints range of movement.

Because dynamic stretching mimics the movement that will be used in the sport or activity, it is usually used in a warm up routine.

– Ballistic

This stretch can be quite risky and should only be used by high level athletes.

Ballistic stretching is when an athlete stretches past their natural range of motion by using the body’s momentum.

E.G – when an athlete bends down to touch their toes, stretching their calves, then incorporates a bouncing type motion to further extend the stretch.

The reason why this stretch is quite risky is because the athlete could cause injury by over stretching the muscle and tearing it.

Ballistic stretching can be beneficial for elite athletes who know what they are doing and those who are highly flexible.

This is because it can activate the myotatic reflex (or the stretch reflex). This is an involuntary muscle contraction which aims to prevent any tears or injury to a muscle if it is extended past its usual range of motion.

Full Written Notes

Critical Question 1 – How do athletes train for improved performance?

FLEXIBILITY TRAINING                    

Static

Static stretching involves a slow stretch, which holds the muscle at a specific length. The muscle reaches its end point, where the stretch is held, generally for approximately 30 seconds.

This is the most common form of stretching, especially for children and novice athletes, because it is easy to perform. Minimal risk is involved as the athlete can feel and determine their own limitations.

You will often see athletes incorporate this form of stretching in both the warm up and cool down phases of a session. It can also be used by individuals who have an injury and are trying to restore their range of movement by gently stretching the muscle.

Dynamic

Dynamic stretching is a controlled movement, which allows athletes to lengthen and shorten their muscles. It typically mimics a movement that will be performed during a sport or activity about to be undertaken. Because dynamic stretching mimics the movement that will be used in the sport or activity, it is usually used in a warm up routine.

This stretch is relatively safe, though can cause injuries if the athlete has not warmed up properly or tries to exceed their joints range of movement. A dynamic stretch should not force the range of motion to exceed what is natural for that movement.

Ballistic

Ballistic stretching is a type of high risk flexibility training and should only be used by experienced, high level athletes. Ballistic stretching involves stretching past the natural range of motion by using the body’s momentum. For example, when an athlete bends down to touch their toes, stretching their calves, and then incorporates a bouncing type motion to further extend the stretch. This stretch is quite risky is because athletes can injure themselves by over stretching the muscle and tearing it.

However, ballistic stretching can be beneficial for elite athletes who know what they are doing or are highly flexible. This is because it can activate the myotatic reflex (or the stretch reflex). This is an involuntary muscle contraction, which prevents any tears or injury to a muscle if it is extended past the usual range of motion.