Study Notes

AEROBIC TRAINING

– Continuous/uniform

The continuous form of training means training for an extended period of time or a minimum of 20 minutes without stopping for rest breaks if benefits are to occur.

It should be low intensity and sustained, trying to maintain 70-85% of Maximum Heart Rate.

The main idea of this form of training is to develop cardiorespiratory endurance of the individual as well as aerobic carrying capacity.

Some examples of this type of training include running, cycling and swimming.

When completing this form of training, you will see improvements made to the stroke volume in the heart as well as decreasing your resting heart rate.

It is important to remember that you must incorporate the overload principle to see improvements being made.

E.G – Three to four times a week for a novice athlete is sufficient to begin with, however an elite athlete should incorporate five to six sessions a week to see gains being made.

This type of training would be beneficial for athletes who participate in endurance sports like marathon runs or triathlons, where the required strategy is to ensure movement is constant and consistent throughout.

– Fartlek Training

This type of training is designed to improve an athlete’s lactate threshold as well VO2 max.

Many team sports will utilise this form of training as it mimics their game play.

This type of training is beneficial for any sports where more than one energy system is used.

E.G – a soccer player will sprint for that through ball, jog back to get onside or defend by jockeying the opposition.

Fartlek means ‘Speed Play’ in Swedish which is why in some sporting circles Fartlek can also be known as ‘Speed Play Training’. This is a type of training that consists of continuous exercise combined with a change in intensity.

E.g. High speed bursts/sprints, varying distances, terrain or time.

Therefore an example of what this looks like is:

an athlete starts running at low intensity and then decides to sprint for 50 metres, then goes back into a jog, then sprint for 30 meters, jogs, sprints up a hill, jogs, sprints hard for 10 seconds etc.

Or another example could be running on a bush trail that has hills or slopes where the athlete objective objective is to maintain their pace throughout the session.

– Long Interval

This form of aerobic training involves using repetitions of high intensity followed by recovery.

The periods of work are generally three times longer than that of the recovery.

This helps develop the body’s aerobic system, as well as develop the athlete’s endurance levels (compared to just using continuous long distance cardio running)

The other method of this form of training is to have one proportion at high intensity, whilst the other remaining proportion/s will instead incorporate a low intensity activity (for example a walk).

E.G. – On an athletics track, running a 100metre at a high intensity, walking 50 metres at a lower intensity and then move into another 100 meter high intensity run etc.

Full Written Notes

Critical Question 1 – How do athletes train for improved performance?

AEROBIC TRAINING

Continuous/uniform

The continuous or uniform method requires athletes to train for an extended period of time (a minimum of 20 minutes) without stopping for rest breaks. The exercise should be low intensity and sustained, with athletes ideally maintaining 70-85% of Maximum Heart Rate. Continuous training develops the cardiorespiratory endurance of an individual as well as their aerobic carrying capacity. Some examples of this type of training include running, cycling and swimming.

People who participate in this type of training will see improvements made to the stroke volume of the heart as well as a decrease in their resting heart rate. It is important to remember that the overload principle must be incorporated in order for long term benefits to occur. For example, training, three to four times a week is sufficient for a novice, however an elite athlete should incorporate five to six sessions a week if they want to see gains being made. This type of training is beneficial to athletes who participate in endurance sports like marathon runs or triathlons, where the required strategy is to ensure movement is constant and consistent.

Fartlek training                  

This type of training is designed to improve an athlete’s lactate threshold as well as their VO2 max and is used in many team sports as it mimics game play. Fartlek training is best suited for any sport where more than one energy system is used. For example, soccer players will sprint for a ball, jog to get on side or defend by jockeying the opposition.

Fartlek means ‘Speed Play’ in Swedish which is why it is sometimes referred to as ‘Speed Play Training’. Training consists of continuous exercise combined with a change in intensity. An example of Fartlek training is when an athlete starts running at low intensity, sprints for 50 metres, jogs, sprints for 30 meters, jogs, sprints up a hill, jogs and then sprints hard for 10 seconds. Another example involves running on a bush trail that has hills or slopes where the athlete objectives is to maintain their pace throughout the session regardless of the terrain.

Long Interval

This form of aerobic training involves using repetitions of high intensity followed by recovery. The periods of movement are generally three times longer than that of the recovery stage. Long interval training helps develop the body’s aerobic system and endurance levels (compared to just using continuous long distance cardio running). An alternative style of this form of training incorporates stages of high intensity exercise followed by a low intensity activity like walking. For example, sprinting 100 metres on a track then walking 50 metres and then repeating the cycle several times.